Fun Bio:

 

Ali Fitzgerald is an artist and writer living between Paris and Berlin, which is slightly less pretentious and exciting than it sounds. 

 

Her favorite birds are Cormorants and Crows. The font used on this site is called "Cormorant Garamond" combining both her love for avian deep-divers and typefaces. 

 

She is currently living a very nice life with her sweetheart, who makes an incredible strawberry-thyme topping for pancakes. 

She is very concerned about the state of the world. Sometimes this manifests itself productively, at other times, not so much.

 

Work Bio:

Ali Fitzgerald is a regular contributor to the The New Yorker, where she writes and draws a monthly column called "America!" She also wrote and drew the popular comic Hungover Bear and Friends for McSweeney's and currently contributes comics to the Book Section of the New York Times.

She also created a monthly visual column for Art das Kunst Magazin and a weekly comic for New York Magazine’s the Cut called "Bermuda Square."

Other comics//drawings have appeared in The Guardianthe Huffington PostArt21Vox.comModern PaintersGastronomicaBerlin Quarterly, and Bitch Magazine . Her artwork has been exhibited in the U.S. and Europe as well as mentioned in the Economist, Bookriot, the Atlantic, the New York TimesArtliesVaroom MagazineThe GuardianArt in AmericaAfar Magazinethe TagesspiegelDadada Magazine and Tip Magazin

Writing:

She contributed arts writing to the e-magazine Art21 from 2010 to 2016, where she started the column Queer Berlin in 2013. She has also written for Daily Serving...might be goodPastelegramNew York Arts Magazine, Granta and the New Yorker

Lectures and Workshops:

In the Summer of 2015 she began a weekly comic workshop with asylum-seekers which was supported by Comic Invasion and Amnesty International. The comic workshops and the drawings created were featured in Bento.dethe Taggespiegel and Amnesty International Magazine.

In the Spring of 2016 she gave a keynote lecture on Visual Storytelling as a Tool to Affect Social Change at the Lesbians Who Tech Summit in San Francisco. In May 2016, she gave a comics lecture and workshop at the National Library in Germany. In 2018, she gave visual storytelling workshops at the University of Bath and Shakespeare and Company in Paris. 

In the fall of 2018 she did a book tour for “Drawn to Berlin: Comic Workshops in Refugee Shelters and Other Stories from a New Europe,” which included talks at the Skowhegan art space in New York, Quincy’s in Chicago, Politics and Prose in Washington D.C. and the Portland Book Festival. 

In 2019 she gave artist talks and comic workshops at Davidson College, the University of North Carolina in Charlotte, Grafill in Norway and the University of Mississippi. In 2020 she had a solo exhibition at SP2 Gallery in Berlin and completed a series of comic-murals for the Humboldt Forum.

Awards: 


In 2017 she was awarded the Cornish Fellowship with the Center for Cartoon Studies. And in early 2018 she was awarded the Georgia Fee Fellowship in Paris through Artslant. In the Spring of 2018 she collaborated with the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art to create a series of drawings about Magritte to coincide with their exhibition of his works. 

Her critically acclaimed first graphic nonfiction book, "Drawn to Berlin: Comic Workshops in Refugee Shelters and Other Stories from a New Europe" was published in late 2018 with Fantagraphics. It was named one of the best comics of 2018 by New York Magazine: Vulture and won the Independent Publisher’s award for best graphic book of 2019.

In the fall of 2020 she will be a resident at the Maison des Artistes in Angoulême, France.